The Film Canister

Pictures of your favorite old hollywood stars as you've never seen them before at home, at play, and at work. Disclaimer: The Film Canister does not claim the rights to any of the pictures on the website. More information about where pictures come from can be found on our resources page. Please contact me if something is unlisted so that I can rectify the situation.
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When Life magazine visited the Baby Jane set, Bette, in the name of vanity, got to compete with Joan. Assisting on the shoot was New York illustrator Joe Eula. “We needed an old-time but classy background for Bette and Joan,” said Eula, “so we decided to photograph them sitting on the front of a vintage Rolls-Royce. (…) We had the lights set, and we were ready for the two dames. It was fairly early in the day, and they arrived wearing formal gowns, furs, and diamonds, behaving like they always dressed like this for breakfast. Bette arrived first, and Miss Crawford was late. So we sat and waited, and Davis was a little miffed. But once Crawford arrived, the two pros got in there and did their stuff. They arched their backs, threw their heads back, and we were back in the golden days when these two superstars ruled the town.”

When Life magazine visited the Baby Jane set, Bette, in the name of vanity, got to compete with Joan. Assisting on the shoot was New York illustrator Joe Eula. “We needed an old-time but classy background for Bette and Joan,” said Eula, “so we decided to photograph them sitting on the front of a vintage Rolls-Royce. (…) We had the lights set, and we were ready for the two dames. It was fairly early in the day, and they arrived wearing formal gowns, furs, and diamonds, behaving like they always dressed like this for breakfast. Bette arrived first, and Miss Crawford was late. So we sat and waited, and Davis was a little miffed. But once Crawford arrived, the two pros got in there and did their stuff. They arched their backs, threw their heads back, and we were back in the golden days when these two superstars ruled the town.”

(via bettylove)

francisalbertsinatra:

James Kaplan, author of Frank: The Voice, introduced his biography of Frank Sinatra with the following:

What is a poet? A poet is an unhappy being whose heart is torn by secret sufferings, but whose lips are so strangely formed that when the sighs and the cries escape them, they sound like beautiful music…And men crowd about the poet and say to him: “Sing for us soon again”; that is as much to say: “May new sufferings torment your soul.”

-Kierkegaard, Either/Or

(via bettylove)

Something I completely forgot about: my blog turned four years-old last month. Crazy! 

(Source: thefilmcanister)